im-bewildered

spaceoddity212:

slayboybunny:

interquast:

so, just in case y’all think that fat fetishization isn’t a big deal, or just in case you think that fatphobia doesn’t exist

fat fetishization of fat girls is often linked to sexism. this is proof of that. notice how i did nothing to to provoke this guy. he went on this tirade for close to a half hour while i said nothing. he just kept going.

this is so disgusting honestly wow

Can I backhand this guy?

im-bewildered

knitted-pigeons asked:

Hello! I know this isn't the loveliest of questions, but in your UN child morality post you said that one of the preventable diseases that 1/3 of children die from is diarrhea. I know diarrhea is disgusting and unpleasant and all, but how do you die from it?

fishingboatproceeds answered:

You die from diarrhea because of dehydration. Sometimes kids have diarrhea that requires IV hydration, for instance, and there’s very little of that available in rural areas in the developing world. There are much better rehydration solutions than there used to be, but the only good solution is 1. better sanitation so toilets don’t flow into water that gets used for drinking, and 2. clean water. 

When he was 2, my son had a diarrhea illness (campylobacter) that in the developing world could’ve proven fatal, but he was fine because he lives in the U.S. and we can go to CVS and buy Pedialyte, and if we couldn’t keep him hydrated, we would’ve taken him to the hospital. Bugs that cause childhood diarrhea are almost never fatal in the U.S., but more than half a million kids under five are going to die of diarrheal illnesses for want of clean waters, good toilets, and antibiotics that cost 20 cents per dose.

It’s infuriating. I saw a boy in Ethiopia who was extremely sick and possibly dying because of diarrhea, and it’s just so needless. He probably had rotavirus, and there’s a rotavirus vaccine, but it costs $2.50, which means many communities can’t provide it.

I am so angry about that boy’s needless suffering. I am so outraged about the needless deaths of millions of children every year. The progress in health outcomes in Ethiopia and many other countries in the developing world over the last 20 years is astounding. It’s unprecedented in human history. But we need to invest much more to get people in the developing world the basic resources they need to afford the 20-cent antibiotics and the $2.50 vaccines.